TERRAH BLOG

TERRAH BLOG

Terrah Essentials

By Aaron Chua 11 Sep, 2017

Parabens easily penetrate the skin. The European Commission on Endocrine Disruption has listed parabens as Category 1 priority substances, based on evidence that they interfere with hormone function. Parabens can mimic estrogen, the primary female sex hormone. They have been detected in human breast cancer tissues, suggesting a possible association between parabens in cosmetics and cancer. Parabens may also interfere with male reproductive functions. In addition, studies indicate that methylparaben applied on the skin reacts with UVB leading to increased skin aging and DNA damage.

Parabens occur naturally at low levels in certain foods, such as barley, strawberries, currents, vanilla, carrots, and onions, although a synthetic preparation derived from petrochemicals is used in cosmetics. Parabens in foods are metabolized when eaten, making them less strongly estrogenic. In contrast, when applied to the skin and absorbed into the body, parabens in cosmetics bypass the metabolic process and enter the blood stream and body organs intact. It has been estimated that women are exposed to 50 mg per day of parabens from cosmetics. More research is needed concerning the resulting levels of parabens in people. Studies conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) did find four different parabens in human urine samples, indicating exposure despite the very low levels in products. You can find out more about parabens here.

The market is bustling with alternatives to chemically laden soaps and these are the all-natural "handmade" soaps loaded with healthy, plant-based ingredients.

At Terrah Essentials, all of our products are free from SLS, SLES, parabens, and synthetic fragrances. From soaps to shampoos and facial care, using our products will show you significant positive changes in no time!

By Aaron Chua 11 Sep, 2017
Triclosan is used mainly in antiperspirants/deodorants, cleansers, and hand sanitizers as a preservative and an anti-bacterial agent. In addition to cosmetics, triclosan is also used as an antibacterial agent in laundry detergent, facial tissues, and antiseptics for wounds, as well as a preservative to resist bacteria, fungus, mildew and odors in other household products that are sometimes advertised as "anti-bacterial." These products include garbage bags, toys, linens, mattresses, toilet fixtures, clothing, furniture fabric, and paints. Triclosan also has medical applications.
By Aaron Chua 11 Sep, 2017

Let me ask you this question:

What's in your soap?
Most bar soaps contain Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS), Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES), and parabens.

What is Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) and Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES)? 
Both Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) and its close relative Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES) are commonly used in many soaps, shampoos, detergents, toothpastes and other products that we expect to "foam up". Both chemicals are very effective foaming agents, chemically known as surfactants.

SLS and SLES are esters of Sulphuric acid - SLS is also known as "Sulfuric acid monododecyl ester sodium salt", however there are over 150 different names by which it is known. In fact, SLES is commonly contaminated with dioxane, a known carcinogen.

Although SLES is somewhat less irritating than Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, it cannot be metabolised by the liver and its effects are therefore much longer-lasting.

A report published in the Journal of The American College of Toxicology in 1983 showed that concentrations as low as 0.5% could cause irritation and concentrations of 10-30% caused skin corrosion and severe irritation. National Institutes of Health "Household Products Directory" of chemical ingredients lists over 80 products that contain SLS. Some soaps have concentrations of up to 30%, which the ACT report called "highly irritating and dangerous."

Shampoos are among the most frequently reported products to the FDA. Reports include eye irritation, scalp irritation, tangled hair, swelling of the hands, face and arms and split and fuzzy hair. The main cause of these problems is sodium lauryl sulfate. Read more about that here.


By Aaron Chua 11 Sep, 2017

1. Try a Dry Shampoo 
A lot of women with fine hair feel like they have to wash their hair everyday to avoid that "greasy" feeling. But washing your hair everyday will actually make it feel more greasy. How so? Your hair follicles produce natural oils that make your hair shiny and full. If you wash your hair a lot, your scalp will feel dry, and your skin will produce too much oil to try to eliminate the dryness. Take a break from your shampoo and and use a little baby powder to soak up the oil. If you have a hard time transitioning, try a dry shampoo. It will eliminate excess oil and limp hair.

2. Get the Right Style 
It may seem tempting to add layers for volume but, that will actually thin your hair out! Many stylists will use a razor to thin the hair out as they add layers. Women will fine hair are able to get the volume they want with angular, blunt cuts.

Shorter cuts can also give the illusion of volume. While hair extensions aren't for everyone, they are a great way to add volume. Some are more permanent and braided to natural hair, but some extensions can be easily put in with clips.

3. Blow Dry Your Hair the Right Way 
Make sure you bow your head as you blow dry your hair. You'll be able to get to the hair roots and add volume this way. Use clips or ties to section off hair, make sure that it is a light spray or mousse. Too much product will weigh your hair down and make it feel greasy.

4. Use a Curling Iron 
Perms are great way to have volume all the time, but they can be damaging. Use a heat spray, and curl your hair with a curling iron for some quick volume.

5. Try Shampoos, Conditioners, and Products that Emphasize Volume 
Make sure that you are buying products that actually cater to fine hair. Although some products are universal to different hair types, you may not get those extra ingredients for volume. Avoid massed produced products, and go for shampoos and conditioners that are free of paragons and SLS. Those ingredients can damage your hair and make it look dull.

6. Backcomb Your Top Layers 
Use a thin comb to tease the top layers of your hair. Viola, instant volume! Be wary of doing this often, as it can break your hair. If you are in a pinch, it's a great option.

7. Once Your Hair is Styled, Leave it Alone 
You maybe tempted to keep running your hands through your hair, but that can actually add even more grease to the roots.

By Aaron Chua 11 Sep, 2017

´╗┐There are two main ways that you can use superfoods to help you get a wonderful clear, soft and energised skin. Two? Well, yes, as well as eating foods to make our skin healthy, we can use foods to make healing and soothing marks and treatments.

So here are some ideas for both foods you should eat, and foods you can whip up into an emergency skin rescue system. First off, one of my favourite outer skin treatments, which is especially good if you suffer from acne and other breakouts.

Egg and honey healthy skin boost 
Take a free range, organic egg and separate yolk and white. Whisk the white until it is stiff. Add the egg yolk to about a tablespoon of liquid honey and a tablespoon of organic oatmeal. Add in the whisked egg white, smooth over your skin and rest for 15 minutes. Wash off with cool water. This has worked like magic for young friends with problem skin.

Avocado dry skin mask 
Take a very ripe avocado, mash the flesh up, smooth over your face, leave for half an hour, rinse with warm water and admire your naturally hydrated skin.

Water 
Not a food as such, but a vital ingredient for you skin health regime. Ensure that you drink eight glasses of good water each day. Bottled water is not necessarily better than the stuff that comes piped to your home – do your research and find a bottled water or filter system which is right for you.

Berries 
Anything which has the word “berry” in its name is a great antioxidant for your whole body. Strawberry, raspberry, loganberry, blueberry – packed with vitamin C, the berry family is your skin’s friend.

Broccoli 
Your mother knew what she was saying when she told you to eat your broccoli. Broccoli is possibly the ultimate superfood for your whole body, and of course your skin, with cell building properties to renew and restore tired skin.

Brazil nuts 
One of the very best, and of course, most delicious, sources of selenium, a powerful antioxidant, and one which is vital to keep your immune system in good shape.

Fat 
Many people wonder why their skin looks dry and old, when they have subjected their body to years of fat deprivation. Eat small amounts of natural fats – olive oil, nut oils, avocado oil, organic butter, oily fish and the fat from naturally reared meat, and see what a marvellous difference it will make to your skin and your overall health.

Omega 3 and Omega 6 
These absolutely essential oils which will build and protect your skin, helping it to be elastic and soft, can only be obtained from foods. Eat walnuts, walnut oil, linseed, flax seed, and give your skin a real superfood boost.

P.S. If you find today’s newsletter insightful, please forward it to a friend, colleague or client you think it could help :)

By Aaron Chua 01 Sep, 2017

Private Labels/Brands, also known as "phantom brands", are brands typically manufactured or provided by one company for offer under another company's brand. They are usually positioned as lower-costs alternatives to regional, national, or international brands.

Terrah Essentials is here to provide you our products as a private brand to give you the highest quality for the lowest of prices. We're here to:

  • help enhance small businesses retail services
  • give you control over your pricing
  • provide the opportunity promote your own brand
  • provide the opportunity to gain a solid following

Our products are also 95% vegan and we use USDA-certified organic ingredients! We're able to accommodate for all sorts of people! If you're interested in collaborating with us, contact us with your enquiries for more details!

By Aaron Chua 01 Sep, 2017


1.) Bananas and Avocados

2 to 3 bananas can be mixed with 1 avocado to make a dry scalp solvent and relieve itchiness. This mixture is to be applied directly to the scalp. Let it stay on your scalp for approximately 30 minutes and rinse it out afterwards. Make sure to be thorough with your rinse!

2.) Witch Hazel (with Water)

Witch Hazel can be mixed with water to help relieve an itchy scalp as well. The mixture is to be poured onto the scalp and massaged thoroughly thereafter. It is recommended to wash your hair and scalp after applying this mixture.

3.) Sesame Seed Oil

Sesame seed oil can be slightly heated to make an effective treatment for dry scalp. The scalp is to be massaged before going to bed. Use your fingertips and continue massaging for a minimum of 10 minutes for maximum results. Be sure to wash and rinse your hair in the next morning. Do this as many times as needed.

4.) Jojoba Oil

Jojoba oil is a great remedy due to it's molecular structure being a lot like the natural oil that fights scalp dehydration on our skin. Just use a small amount on your scalp and massage for 3 to 5 minutes. Leave it on your scalp overnight and wash it in the morning. Be sure to use a mild shampoo for the best results!

5.) Beer (I know, crazy!)

Mixed with eggs and oil, beer becomes an excellent natural conditioner for the hair and scalp. Make sure to use full-bodied beer instead of light beer for this. Whole beer will lather much better than the light beer, thereby making whole beer the better solution as a conditioner.

6.) Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera gel is a natural moisturizer that has agents for relieving itchiness and dryness. If you can't find fresh Aloe Vera, it can be purchased at any drug/health/grocery store.

7.) Coconut Oil

Apply a small amount of coconut oil onto the scalp after washing your hair. Make sure the scalp is clean and keep the oil in for a minimum of 30 minutes. Wash the oil out with an odor free shampoo to prevent any infections. (The coconut oil can also be slightly heated and mixed with your shampoo before washing your hair)

8.) Tea Tree Oil

Mixed with 1/2 cup of baby shampoo; 10 to 20 drops of Tea Tree Oil becomes an excellent medication for a damaged scalp. Tea tree oil has natural fungi-fighting agents and anti-bacterial properties so it is ideal for treating an itchy scalp.

9.) Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar has been known the eliminate the yeast and viral properties that cause an itchy scalp. It can relieve itchy scalp and dryness by balancing the pH levels of the scalp.

10. Lemon Juice

Lemon juice can be an excellent aid for dandruff. The citric acid of a lemon gives it antiseptic properties which makes it an ultimate cleaning solution. Mix lemon juice with some yogurt and put it on your scalp. Leave it there for a few minutes before rinsing it out and wash your hair with a gentle shampoo. Repeat the process as much as needed!

11.) Baking Soda

Baking soda is excellent for treating an itchy scalp. Use baking soda to make a paste solution that can be applied directly to the scalp. It's recommended to apply a little olive oil before using the baking soda solution. Let the solution sit on your scalp for 10 minutes and then rinse thoroughly with water.

So those are 11 of the natural ways you can treat a dry or itchy scalp! These methods have worked since the beginning of time so take these into consideration before running out and buying expensive solutions!

Terrah Essentials

By Aaron Chua 11 Sep, 2017

Parabens easily penetrate the skin. The European Commission on Endocrine Disruption has listed parabens as Category 1 priority substances, based on evidence that they interfere with hormone function. Parabens can mimic estrogen, the primary female sex hormone. They have been detected in human breast cancer tissues, suggesting a possible association between parabens in cosmetics and cancer. Parabens may also interfere with male reproductive functions. In addition, studies indicate that methylparaben applied on the skin reacts with UVB leading to increased skin aging and DNA damage.

Parabens occur naturally at low levels in certain foods, such as barley, strawberries, currents, vanilla, carrots, and onions, although a synthetic preparation derived from petrochemicals is used in cosmetics. Parabens in foods are metabolized when eaten, making them less strongly estrogenic. In contrast, when applied to the skin and absorbed into the body, parabens in cosmetics bypass the metabolic process and enter the blood stream and body organs intact. It has been estimated that women are exposed to 50 mg per day of parabens from cosmetics. More research is needed concerning the resulting levels of parabens in people. Studies conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) did find four different parabens in human urine samples, indicating exposure despite the very low levels in products. You can find out more about parabens here.

The market is bustling with alternatives to chemically laden soaps and these are the all-natural "handmade" soaps loaded with healthy, plant-based ingredients.

At Terrah Essentials, all of our products are free from SLS, SLES, parabens, and synthetic fragrances. From soaps to shampoos and facial care, using our products will show you significant positive changes in no time!

By Aaron Chua 11 Sep, 2017
Triclosan is used mainly in antiperspirants/deodorants, cleansers, and hand sanitizers as a preservative and an anti-bacterial agent. In addition to cosmetics, triclosan is also used as an antibacterial agent in laundry detergent, facial tissues, and antiseptics for wounds, as well as a preservative to resist bacteria, fungus, mildew and odors in other household products that are sometimes advertised as "anti-bacterial." These products include garbage bags, toys, linens, mattresses, toilet fixtures, clothing, furniture fabric, and paints. Triclosan also has medical applications.
By Aaron Chua 11 Sep, 2017

Let me ask you this question:

What's in your soap?
Most bar soaps contain Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS), Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES), and parabens.

What is Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) and Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES)? 
Both Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) and its close relative Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES) are commonly used in many soaps, shampoos, detergents, toothpastes and other products that we expect to "foam up". Both chemicals are very effective foaming agents, chemically known as surfactants.

SLS and SLES are esters of Sulphuric acid - SLS is also known as "Sulfuric acid monododecyl ester sodium salt", however there are over 150 different names by which it is known. In fact, SLES is commonly contaminated with dioxane, a known carcinogen.

Although SLES is somewhat less irritating than Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, it cannot be metabolised by the liver and its effects are therefore much longer-lasting.

A report published in the Journal of The American College of Toxicology in 1983 showed that concentrations as low as 0.5% could cause irritation and concentrations of 10-30% caused skin corrosion and severe irritation. National Institutes of Health "Household Products Directory" of chemical ingredients lists over 80 products that contain SLS. Some soaps have concentrations of up to 30%, which the ACT report called "highly irritating and dangerous."

Shampoos are among the most frequently reported products to the FDA. Reports include eye irritation, scalp irritation, tangled hair, swelling of the hands, face and arms and split and fuzzy hair. The main cause of these problems is sodium lauryl sulfate. Read more about that here.


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